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Personal opinions and comments on financial topics of all kinds.

Caught between strength and stagnation: a glance at the franc, interest rates and dividends

At a time when stock market indices all over the world are hitting new highs, the Swiss market is standing out for its remarkable restraint. The DAX, CAC 40, DJII and S&P500 have all been putting in impressive performances and setting new records, but the Swiss equity market is stuck some 10% below its all-time high at the end of 2021. This raises questions, especially as the Swiss franc has appreciated strongly against the dollar and the euro, and as major stocks like Roche and Nestlé show signs of weakness. In our interview with Chief Investment Officer Luca Carrozzo we investigate the reasons behind the poor performance of the Swiss market, discuss the role of the strong franc and consider whether the Swiss National Bank (SNB) needs to cut interest rates to get the equity markets going again. Find out why Swiss securities are out of favour at the moment and what this means for investors.

Cybersecurity in e-banking: Trust and security in a digitally connected world

Rapid digitalisation of the financial industry has revolutionised the way people do their banking. This has not only increased efficiency and user-friendliness, but also created new challenges when it comes to security and data protection. For banks, ensuring a protected digital environment is a top priority. For this reason, they continuously invest in innovative technologies and training to constantly maintain security standards.

Opinions on the stock market: Swatch

The Swatch share is at the same price level as in the year 2000, even though the company has more than doubled its turnover and profit during this time. The weak share price can be attributed to the vague corporate strategy, a lack of vision and poor communication with shareholders and financial analysts.

Maximum contribution to pillar 3 in 2024: how much can you pay in?

Voluntary 3a retirement savings are a key part of the Swiss pension system. They allow us to maintain our accustomed standard of living and keep up quality of life in our old age. But who actually determines how much we can pay in to pillar 3 every year? This post looks at how the annual maximum contribution is calculated, how often it changes and when it’s the best time to contribute.

perspectives 01/2024

2023 was a challenging year for stock markets. Ultimately it drew to a positive end, but along the way it showed us the increasing importance of good risk management. 2024 too has risks investors should not underestimate. There is no end in sight to the wars in Ukraine and the Middle East, and the tensions in the Far East are also unlikely to ease. On top of that, some countries are facing elections which could have consequences beyond national borders or even for the whole world.

Is ESG worthwhile for investors?

ESG is becoming an increasingly prominent issue for private clients, and for younger ones in particular sustainable investing is essential. Even more attention will be focused on the issue from 1 January 2024, when the mandatory minimum investment standards of the Swiss Bankers Association come into effect.

Regular contributions to pillar 3a: the way to ensure a carefree retirement

The sooner you pay into pillar 3a, the more you profit later. Pillar 3a is worth it, regardless of the size of the annual contributions. The fact that payments are regular is crucial and each franc contributed is worthwhile. Not just because every franc is tax-deductible, but also because the effect of compound interest ensures that your savings grow each year without you having to do anything.

Opinions on the stock market: Roche

from the collapse in demand for COVID tests. Even so, it grew 7% in the third quarter and reported double-digit growth rates in the high-margin pharma division for the first time in years. Patent expires on the three big cancer drugs (Avastin, Herceptin and Rituxan) are becoming less significant, as are the COVID tests, and from 2024 onwards Roche will be back on track for double-digit growth.

A win-win situation: optimise your retirement savings and save taxes

Make sure you are best prepared for the future. If you plan for the long term in Switzerland, you can optimise your retirement savings and save taxes at the same time. How does that work, exactly? This blog post explains how you can cut your tax burden and boost your retirement savings, even if you have a high income.

Navigating Stressed Real Estate in 2023: Overcoming Challenges and Uncovering Opportunities

In the fast-paced world of real estate investing, 2023 has brought forth a myriad of challenges for investors. From soaring inflation rates to the collapse of prominent banks (such as SVB) and ongoing geopolitical tensions, the real estate market has been significantly impacted. However, amidst these challenges lie hidden opportunities for those willing to navigate the stormy waters of the industry.

perspectives 04/2023

The Swiss economy stagnated in the second quarter. However, the labour market remained strong, which had a positive impact on private consumption. The data published suggest that the Swiss economy is becoming less resilient. The problems encountered by Germany, Switzerland’s largest trading partner, are becoming increasingly evident. Meanwhile, the weakness of China is weighing on industrial exports. This suggests that the slowdown in global growth appears to have reached Switzerland.

Clever planning secures your future: Maximise retirement assets when withdrawing them

Retirement assets are saved up during employment, often for a pension or better retirement provision. Besides government levies, old-age and survivors’ insurance (OASI) contributions (pillar 1) and employers’ contributions to the pension fund (pillar 2), employed persons with an income subject to OASI contributions can also pay into pillar 3 – the tied pillar 3a retirement provision – and in turn deduct the contributions from taxable income.

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